Architectural Design Patterns 2 – Model-View-Controller (MVC)

Architectural Design Patterns 2 – Model-View-Controller (MVC)

When you’re diving into the world of software design, you’ll often hear about the Model-View-Controller, or MVC for short. It’s one of those blueprints, or design patterns, that helps developers keep their code tidy and well-organized. In this piece, we’ll take a close look at what MVC is and how its parts play together.

Model: The Model is the brain behind the data. It’s where you keep everything related to the data you’re working with: fetching it, updating it, or even deleting it. Imagine you have an app that keeps track of books in a library. The Model will have all the information about these books, like the title, author, and published date. More than just storing, the Model sets the rules on how data can change or get presented. If a book goes out of stock, for instance, it’s the Model’s responsibility to know this and update accordingly.

View: The View is all about presentation. It’s what the user sees and interacts with. In our library app, the View would display the list of books, show pictures of the book covers, and maybe even have a search bar to find a specific title. It’s like a window into your app. But remember, the View doesn’t decide what to show on its own. It gets that info from the Model. So if a book is out of stock, the Model tells the View, and the View might show that book as “unavailable”.

Controller: Now, the Controller is the mediator between the Model and the View. You can think of it as the manager of a store. When you, as a customer (or the View), want to buy a book, you tell the manager (the Controller). The managger then checks the stock (asks the Model) and handles the sale. If the book is out of stock, the manager informs you (updates the View). In software terms, if you click on a book title wanting to buy it, the Controller handles this request. It asks the Model for the book details and updates the View to show the book’s info.

All in all, MVC is a cool way to split an application and making sure everything has its place and does its job efficiently. It helps keep the user interface clean, the data correct, and the actions or logic clear and separate.

Suleyman Cabir Ataman, PhD

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Suleyman Cabir Ataman

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